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If All Of This Seems Familiar, That Is Because We Have Seen It All Before…

Francesco Abbruzzino, The Uncensored Report, LLC

 

 

It is often said that history repeats itself, but usually it doesn’t happen quite so quickly.  If you are getting a sinking feeling because current events bear such a close resemblance to early 2020, you are definitely not alone.  All over the globe, the Omicron variant is causing a wave of tremendous fear that is unlike anything that we have seen since the first half of last year.  And based on the response so far, it appears that we haven’t learned much since then.  We are witnessing so many of the exact same patterns play out, and that could have very important implications for the year ahead of us.  Interestingly, many on social media are now reminding us that 2022 is pronounced “2020 too”, and that is certainly quite a depressing thought.

 

Do you remember all of those ominous projections that “the experts” were giving us back at the very start of the COVID pandemic?

 

Well, it is happening again.  Researchers at the University of Washington made headlines all over the world this week when they warned that there could be 140 million new COVID infections in the United States in January and February

 

Researchers at the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation at the University of Washington’s School of Medicine revised its COVID-19 modeling to include updated information about the omicron variant.

 

They found the U.S. may see a total of about 140 million new infections from Jan. 1 to March 1, 2022, peaking in late-January at about 2.8 million new daily infections.

 

Wow, that sounds really bad.

 

But of course we have seen similar projections before, and every time they were dead wrong.

 

And just like when the pandemic first began, New York City is the epicenter for this new wave of infections…

 

New York once again smashed COVID records on Wednesday, with the new Omicron variant blamed for an all-time high of 28,924 cases reported across the Empire State.

 

Gov. Kathy Hochul announced the numbers at a news conference Wednesday – the fifth day in the last six where New York has broken its prior COVID diagnosis records, and the sixth day in a row that there has been more than 20,000 cases across the state.

 

Doesn’t it seem odd that New York City just keeps setting new record after new record even though so many New Yorkers have been “fully vaccinated”?

 

In fact, it has been reported that a whopping 85 percent of all New York City residents have received at least one injection.

 

Is there someone out there that can explain to me what is going on?

 

Another parallel to the early days of the pandemic is that Bill Gates is starting to make lots of noise again.  He says that he has canceled most of his holiday plans because of Omicron, and he is warning that the “worst part of the pandemic” could be right in front of us…

 

Bill Gates said he called off his holiday plans as the omicron variant ushers in what he predicts could be the “worst part of the pandemic.” He also predicted, however, that the current surge in COVID-19 cases could be over within months, and the pandemic itself may end next year “if we take the right steps.”

 

“Just when it seemed like life would return to normal, we could be entering the worst part of the pandemic,” he tweeted on Tuesday. “Omicron will hit home for all of us. Close friends of mine now have it, and I’ve canceled most of my holiday plans.”

 

That is funny, because he originally told us that if we did everything that he was urging us to do that things would be much better by now.

 

But guys like him will never admit that they were wrong.

 

Thanks to all of the fear that is being generated, we are starting to see major sporting events being canceled just like we did in early 2020.  For example, the NHL has decided to “pause” their entire season

 

The headlines on Monday night were stark, if unsurprising: The NHL was going to pause the 2021-22 season Wednesday, and resume after Christmas break, amid a spike in COVID-19 cases. This followed a flurry of team shutdowns that left a diminishing number of games on the schedule.

 

In the aftermath, we’re left with several questions: How will teams get “unpaused”? Will there be a change in protocols? How does this impact the Olympics and All-Star Weekend?

 

And The Gator Bowl is in danger of not being played because Texas A&M decided to pull out of the game at the last minute

 

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